syntaxbitch:

Yes, yes. Very nice. But I’m just gonna add my favorite wardrobe change.

(via modern-northernness)

This BEAUTIFUL PRINCESS!!!!

(via xofrnk)

(via xofrnk)

notpetewentz:

this man is an actual legend

(via ohimtherebabe)

ronaldtherapist:

IM ACTUALLY LAUGHNG SO HARD

(via ziggypasta)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

How Wolves Change Rivers

Check out this brilliant short film from Sustainable Human about the effects of reintroducing wolves to Yellowstone National Park, where they had been absent since the last one was killed in 1926 until their reintroduction in 1995. 

While recent research suggests that the real story isn’t quite as neat and tidy as the one presented in the film (trophic cascades and food webs are incredibly complex! Who knew?!), it’s a great reminder of how every thread of an ecosystem plays an important part in weaving nature’s tapestry.

odins-one-eyed-fuck:

isthisusernametakenyet:

I support Farming.

In fact, you could call me

image

WOW

(via folieacollyn)

this man and his magnificent mane

joshreads:

me IRL right now

joshreads:

me IRL right now

(via yahighway)

History …[is] where everything unexpected in its own time is chronicled on the page as inevitable. … The terror of the unforeseen is what the science of history hides, turning a disaster into an epic. — Philip Roth, The Plot Against America (2004)